Sat. Mar 6th, 2021

Twitter has become the first social media outlet to announce a crackdown on the QAnon conspiracy theory, banning thousands of accounts and blocking web addresses linking to videos and websites spreading it. But what is QAnon and what do its followers believe? Subscribe to our channel here:

At its heart, QAnon is a wide-ranging, unfounded conspiracy theory that says that Donald Trump is waging a secret war against elite Satan-worshipping paedophiles in government, business and the media.

QAnon believers have speculated that this fight will lead to a day of reckoning where prominent people such as Hillary Clinton will be arrested and executed.

It may sound outlandish, but it hasn’t stopped President Trump himself retweeting tweets from accounts supporting the theories – and those in his circle have posted imagery linked to the group. Since the coronavirus pandemic took hold in the US in March there’s been a surge in online QAnon groups.

As the US gears up for its presidential election in November, BBC Population Correspondent Stephanie Hegarty and producer Emma Ailes have been taking a deeper look into Q-Anon.

#BBC #Newsnight #BBCNews

Newsnight is the BBC’s flagship news and current affairs TV programme – with analysis, debate, exclusives, and robust interviews.

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5 thoughts on “QAnon: The conspiracy theory spreading fake news – BBC Newsnight”
  1. 9 seconds in , “a bizarre conspiracy theory “, I mean, I’m not into Q but that is some bias reporting right there…9 seconds in.
    We haven’t forgotten Jimmy Savile btw.

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